Category Archives: Lifestyle

Living on AMI

Often Said, Often wrong! Real Estate Terms To Know

I hear it all the time: “Thanks for being my Reel-a tor.” Of course, there’s no “A” in the middle of the word. It’s pronounced, “Reel-tor.”

And there are a bunch of other words also mispronounced all the time. I must confess I’ve done it myself. Here’s a partial list from the Florida Realtor people.

CLICK HERE

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Storm Notes on Hermine

Well, we had lots and lots of rain even before Hermine got named. At my house, we figure somewhere between 8-10 inches early in the week.

Then the depression turned north in the Gulf, and became a tropical storm, and finally, a hurricane. Feeder bands came through, with wind gusts up to about 40 miles per hour. More rain. And a lunar tide much higher than usual. Augmented by a southerly wind that blew lots of water up into the canals and the bays.

All in all, not too bad. Sorta reminiscent of Hurricane Elena, which sat offshore in the Gulf for three days over Labor Day, 1985.

Saving the Coastline Up for Discussion

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It’s not enough to talk the talk about environmental concerns, so making actual strides toward saving what is an important ecosystem, in fact, one that deeply affects the quality of life on Anna Maria Island is extremely important.

Mangroves are important. The beach and water-face, where waves meet sand, is important. Storm water runoff is important.

But governmental forces seem more closely allied with the developers than with the people. And the people have spoken that they want our quality of life — based in large part on our natural environment — to be the highest it can be.

Here’s an article announcing a meeting with Suncoast Waterkeeper coming soon to AMI.

CLICK HERE

Sunray Clams Are the Next Big thing

When I first lived on Anna Maria Island back in the early 1980s, we could walk out off the north end into Tampa Bay and in shallow water harvest sunray clams. Sweet, salty and delicious, they beat all the hard clams, like quahogs, cherrystones and little necks, hands down.

But then, as with most things natural, under the pressure of growth and development, they pretty much disappeared.

Now, they’re being grown for harvest, and the news looks good. Here’s a story from Tampa Bay times that has the details:

CLICK HERE